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Apr 20, 2015

Jake Klamka who did his Masters and Undergraduate degree at U of T Physics mentioned in Nature

Industry allure: PhD holders with quantitative skills are landing posts at technology companies.
Apr 15, 2015

Quantum cryptography at the speed of light

Department of Physics Professor Hoi-Kwong Lo in collaboration with Dr. Azuma and Dr. Tamaki of the Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation in Japan design first all-photonic repeaters
Apr 14, 2015

2015 CAP University Prize Exam Results

U of T takes 1st, 7th, 8th and 9th of the top 10 Spots in Canada!
Mr. Yige Chen under the supervision of Prof. Hae-Young Kee has identified a new class of metal in Iridium oxides. Read all about it in Nature Communications Mar 17, 2015

Mr. Yige Chen under the supervision of Prof. Hae-Young Kee has identified a new class of metal in Iridium oxides. Read all about it in Nature Communications

We used to think that different phases such as liquid, solid, and magnets are classified by broken symmetries, however, it was recently found that distinct phases without any broken symmetry are found due to their non-trivial topological nature.
Professor Stephen Morris' Icicle Atlas featured in the Globe and Mail and Toronto Star Mar 03, 2015

Professor Stephen Morris' Icicle Atlas featured in the Globe and Mail and Toronto Star

Rejoice icicle lovers. Dr. Freeze has delivered his magnum opus. For the record, Stephen Morris, a professor of physics at the University of Toronto, does not call himself Dr. Freeze. But by his own admission, he is obsessed with icicles. He has observed them in the environment and grown them in his lab. He has accumulated thousands of photos and hundreds of videos of icicles forming under different conditions.
Feb 24, 2015

Compressed-format compared to regular-format in a first-year university physics course

Jason Harlow, David Harrison and Eli Honig compared student performance in two sessions of a large first-year university physics course, one with a normal 12-week term and the other with a compressed 6-week term. Student performance was measured by the normalized gain on the Force Concept Inventory. They found that the gains for the regular-format course are better than the gains for the compressed-format course, and while the differences in gains are small they are statistically significant. Not accounted for are the differences in effectiveness of the different instructors in the two versions of the course.
Global warming research: strong storms to become stronger, weak storms to become weaker Jan 30, 2015

Global warming research: strong storms to become stronger, weak storms to become weaker

A study led by atmospheric physicists at the University of Toronto finds that global warming will not lead to an overall increasingly stormy atmosphere, a topic debated by scientists for decades. Instead, strong storms will become stronger while weak storms become weaker, and the cumulative result of the number of storms will remain unchanged.
UofT Physicist selected as part of team to lead major marine Arctic ecosystem study Nov 26, 2014

UofT Physicist selected as part of team to lead major marine Arctic ecosystem study

The University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM), as a part of the Stantec Team, has been selected by an interagency scientific review panel to lead a long-term scientific study of the Arctic marine ecosystem along the Beaufort Sea shelf from Barrow, Alaska to the Mackenzie River delta in Canadian waters. The Marine Arctic Ecosystem Study (MARES) stems from increased attention to climate change, energy development, and sustainability in the Arctic region. Information gained will aid government, industry, and communities in making decisions related to regulations, resource management, economic development and environmental protection issues.
Solving the mystery of increased hydrogen chloride in the Northern Hemisphere Nov 11, 2014

Solving the mystery of increased hydrogen chloride in the Northern Hemisphere

University of Toronto physicist Kaley Walker has helped solve the scientific mystery behind the recent increase in ozone-depleting chemicals in the lower stratosphere of the Northern Hemisphere, despite a 25-year old ban on chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Employing data from various sources, including the Canadian Space Agency's SCISAT satellite, an international team of scientists used numerical simulations to determine that the recently observed increase in hydrogen chloride (HCl) in the lower stratosphere is due to reduced atmospheric circulation in the Northern Hemisphere.
‘Spintronics’ discovery could lead to better electronic devices Nov 10, 2014

‘Spintronics’ discovery could lead to better electronic devices

Scientists have discovered that interactions in certain quantum materials could naturally produce the effects needed for ultra-efficient computers and other electronics.The field of spintronics — a short form of spin transport electronics — seeks to understand and power electronic devices using the quantum property known as electron spin rather than an electron’s charge. Spintronics could lead to efficient circuits and electrical devices that do not waste energy through friction and heat.
Cracking mud, freezing dirt, and breaking rocks Nov 03, 2014

Cracking mud, freezing dirt, and breaking rocks

Ordered crack patterns are so common in nature that they are often overlooked. From tile-like formations in ordinary mud, to the vast polygonal networks that stretch across the polar deserts of Earth and Mars, they are typical features in geomorphology. On smaller scales, crack networks add an artistic flourish to Japanese raku pottery and are found on the paintings of the old masters. Cracking even determines the pattern of scales on the snouts of Nile crocodiles.
Spontaneous spin Hall effect of ultracold atoms Oct 21, 2014

Spontaneous spin Hall effect of ultracold atoms

Moving charges get deflected by a magnetic field, an effect which underlies such applications as isotope separation and the quantum Hall effect which fixes the International standard for electrical resistance.
Ultracold atoms teach us about life on a neutron star May 22, 2014

Ultracold atoms teach us about life on a neutron star

Fermi gases in the so-called unitary regime—where the diverging interactions between atoms make their thermodynamics universal—are an excellent test bed for an array of strongly interacting matter systems. Two places to find a unitary Fermi gas are in the crust of a neutron start, and in basement of McLennan.
Sajeev John wins Killam Prize for pioneering photonics research Apr 09, 2014

Sajeev John wins Killam Prize for pioneering photonics research

One of Canada’s most prestigious scholarly awards, the Killam Prize recognizes outstanding career achievement by scholars actively engaged in research. It is administered by the Canada Council for the Arts and comes with a $100,000 prize.
Reporting from the Arctic: the science behind the mission Mar 12, 2014

Reporting from the Arctic: the science behind the mission

Dan Weaver on climate change, ozone and the magic of sunlight
Reporting from the Arctic: a typical day in Eureka Mar 11, 2014

Reporting from the Arctic: a typical day in Eureka

Dan Weaver is a graduate student at the University of Toronto whose research takes him to PEARL, the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory on Ellesmere Island, near Eureka, Nunavut.
Reporting from the Arctic: the science behind the mission Mar 06, 2014

Reporting from the Arctic: the science behind the mission

What kind of work takes a PhD candidate from U of T's physics department to an experimental lab at the northern edge of Canada? Start with climate, ozone depletion, atmospheric dynamics, and air quality.
Reporting from the Arctic: measuring ozone, tracking satellites, hiking fiords Mar 03, 2014

Reporting from the Arctic: measuring ozone, tracking satellites, hiking fiords

Dan Weaver is a graduate student at the University of Toronto whose research takes him to PEARL, the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory on Ellesmere Island, near Eureka, Nunavut.

Also in this section

Jake Klamka who did his Masters and Undergraduate degree at U of T Physics mentioned in Nature
Industry allure: PhD holders with quantitative skills are landing posts at technology companies.
Quantum cryptography at the speed of light
Department of Physics Professor Hoi-Kwong Lo in collaboration with Dr. Azuma and Dr. Tamaki of the Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation in Japan design first all-photonic repeaters
2015 CAP University Prize Exam Results
U of T takes 1st, 7th, 8th and 9th of the top 10 Spots in Canada!
Mr. Yige Chen under the supervision of Prof. Hae-Young Kee has identified a new class of metal in Iridium oxides. Read all about it in Nature Communications
We used to think that different phases such as liquid, solid, and magnets are classified by broken symmetries, however, it was recently found that distinct phases without any broken symmetry are found due to their non-trivial topological nature.
Prof. John Martin receives the 2015 CAP Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Physics
 
Prof. Pierre Savard receives the 2015 CAP-TRIUMF Vogt Medal for Contributions to Subatomic Physics
 
Professor Stephen Morris' Icicle Atlas featured in the Globe and Mail and Toronto Star
Rejoice icicle lovers. Dr. Freeze has delivered his magnum opus. For the record, Stephen Morris, a professor of physics at the University of Toronto, does not call himself Dr. Freeze. But by his own admission, he is obsessed with icicles. He has observed them in the environment and grown them in his lab. He has accumulated thousands of photos and hundreds of videos of icicles forming under different conditions.
Compressed-format compared to regular-format in a first-year university physics course
Jason Harlow, David Harrison and Eli Honig compared student performance in two sessions of a large first-year university physics course, one with a normal 12-week term and the other with a compressed 6-week term. Student performance was measured by the normalized gain on the Force Concept Inventory. They found that the gains for the regular-format course are better than the gains for the compressed-format course, and while the differences in gains are small they are statistically significant. Not accounted for are the differences in effectiveness of the different instructors in the two versions of the course.
Global warming research: strong storms to become stronger, weak storms to become weaker
A study led by atmospheric physicists at the University of Toronto finds that global warming will not lead to an overall increasingly stormy atmosphere, a topic debated by scientists for decades. Instead, strong storms will become stronger while weak storms become weaker, and the cumulative result of the number of storms will remain unchanged.
UofT Physicist selected as part of team to lead major marine Arctic ecosystem study
The University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM), as a part of the Stantec Team, has been selected by an interagency scientific review panel to lead a long-term scientific study of the Arctic marine ecosystem along the Beaufort Sea shelf from Barrow, Alaska to the Mackenzie River delta in Canadian waters. The Marine Arctic Ecosystem Study (MARES) stems from increased attention to climate change, energy development, and sustainability in the Arctic region. Information gained will aid government, industry, and communities in making decisions related to regulations, resource management, economic development and environmental protection issues.
Solving the mystery of increased hydrogen chloride in the Northern Hemisphere
University of Toronto physicist Kaley Walker has helped solve the scientific mystery behind the recent increase in ozone-depleting chemicals in the lower stratosphere of the Northern Hemisphere, despite a 25-year old ban on chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Employing data from various sources, including the Canadian Space Agency's SCISAT satellite, an international team of scientists used numerical simulations to determine that the recently observed increase in hydrogen chloride (HCl) in the lower stratosphere is due to reduced atmospheric circulation in the Northern Hemisphere.
‘Spintronics’ discovery could lead to better electronic devices
Scientists have discovered that interactions in certain quantum materials could naturally produce the effects needed for ultra-efficient computers and other electronics.The field of spintronics — a short form of spin transport electronics — seeks to understand and power electronic devices using the quantum property known as electron spin rather than an electron’s charge. Spintronics could lead to efficient circuits and electrical devices that do not waste energy through friction and heat.
Cracking mud, freezing dirt, and breaking rocks
Ordered crack patterns are so common in nature that they are often overlooked. From tile-like formations in ordinary mud, to the vast polygonal networks that stretch across the polar deserts of Earth and Mars, they are typical features in geomorphology. On smaller scales, crack networks add an artistic flourish to Japanese raku pottery and are found on the paintings of the old masters. Cracking even determines the pattern of scales on the snouts of Nile crocodiles.
Spontaneous spin Hall effect of ultracold atoms
Moving charges get deflected by a magnetic field, an effect which underlies such applications as isotope separation and the quantum Hall effect which fixes the International standard for electrical resistance.
Ultracold atoms teach us about life on a neutron star
Fermi gases in the so-called unitary regime—where the diverging interactions between atoms make their thermodynamics universal—are an excellent test bed for an array of strongly interacting matter systems. Two places to find a unitary Fermi gas are in the crust of a neutron start, and in basement of McLennan.
Sajeev John wins Killam Prize for pioneering photonics research
One of Canada’s most prestigious scholarly awards, the Killam Prize recognizes outstanding career achievement by scholars actively engaged in research. It is administered by the Canada Council for the Arts and comes with a $100,000 prize.
Reporting from the Arctic: the science behind the mission
Dan Weaver on climate change, ozone and the magic of sunlight
Reporting from the Arctic: a typical day in Eureka
Dan Weaver is a graduate student at the University of Toronto whose research takes him to PEARL, the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory on Ellesmere Island, near Eureka, Nunavut.
Reporting from the Arctic: the science behind the mission
What kind of work takes a PhD candidate from U of T's physics department to an experimental lab at the northern edge of Canada? Start with climate, ozone depletion, atmospheric dynamics, and air quality.
Reporting from the Arctic: measuring ozone, tracking satellites, hiking fiords
Dan Weaver is a graduate student at the University of Toronto whose research takes him to PEARL, the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory on Ellesmere Island, near Eureka, Nunavut.
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