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Program Guidance for Biological Physics Specialists

Tips on how to plan for your Biological Physics Specialist Program of Study.

U of T Physics offers a range of Physics research areas for you to explore. But figuring your way around the Undergraduate Calendar to take advantage of these research interests can be a challenge. To help you out, here is some guidance for specific courses you might take to gain in depth knowledge of different fields.

This guide covers the Biological Physics Specialist program, which was revised into a stream structure for the 2014-2015 academic year.

Please note that the guide assumes you have taken all compulsory courses in any of the respective programs, and bear in mind that these notes are meant as an informal guide. Please contact the Undergraduate Office (ugcoord@physics.utoronto.ca) for more advice and guidance. If you are interested in Biological Physics note that there are three streams that share a core set of courses, but have different sets of advanced courses. Students interested in receiving advanced training in the Life Sciences with a core of Physics should look carefully at the Biochemistry and Physiology Streams. The Biochemistry stream is focused on the chemical and molecular details of Biological Physics while the Physiology stream is more focused on system-level details. Both streams cover the Physical Biology of the Cell. Those students looking for less Life Science focus should choose the Advanced Physics Stream.

Biological Physics Specialist - Biochemistry Stream

In the Biochemistry Stream, BCH370H1 and many BCH400-level courses can be used to satisfy the stream's degree requirements. Below is a list of some of the courses you might consider. For more information, please contact the Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies (ugcoord@physics.utoronto.ca).

  • Courses specialized in molecular biophysics: BCH425H1 “Structural Biology: Principles and Practice” and BCH427H1 “Advanced Molecular Biophysics”.
  • Courses in Cellular Biophysics: BCH426H1 “Regulation of Signalling Pathways” and BCH446H1 “Membrane Dynamics of the Cell Surface.”
  • Courses providing computational training:BCH441H1 “Bioinformatics.”
  • Independent study and research courses: PHY371H1, PHY471H1, PHY478H1, etc.

Biological Physics Specialist - Physiology Stream

In the Physiology Stream,  PSL304H1/PSL305H1/PSL372H1 and PSL400-level courses can be used to satisfy the stream's degree requirements. Below is a list of some of the courses you  might consider. For more information, please contact the Associate  Chair for Undergraduate Studies (ugcoord@physics.utoronto.ca).

  • Courses specialized in modeling and computation: PSL304H1 “Topics in Cellular, Molecular and Organismic Physiology” and PSL432H1 “Theoretical Physiology”.
  • Courses in Neuroscience: PSL432H1 “Theoretical Physiology”, PSL440Y1 “Neuroscience I: Systems and Behaviour” and PSL444Y1 “Neuroscience II: Cellular and Molecular”
  • Independent study and research courses: PHY371H1, PHY471H1, PHY478H1, etc.

Biological Physics Specialist - Advanced Physics Stream

In the Advanced Physics Stream, APM346H1/MAT334H1, PHY300-level and PHY400-level courses can be used to satisfy the stream's degree requirements. Below is a list of some of the courses you might consider. For more information, please contact the Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies (ugcoord@physics.utoronto.ca).

  • Courses specialized in Biological Physics: PHY431H1 “Topics in Biological Physics.”
  • Courses in Statistical Mechanics: PHY452H1 “Statistical Mechanics" and PHY431H1 “Topics in Biological Physics.”
  • Courses in Mathematical Physics: APM346H1 “Partial Differential Equations” and “PHY460H1 Nonlinear Physics”
  • Courses providing practical skills: PHY405H1 "Electronics Lab", PHY407H1 "Computational Physics".
  • Independent study and research courses: PHY371H1,PHY471H1, PHY478H1, etc.