Skip to Content

PHY1498H F (ARTS & SCI 492)
Introduction to Atmospheric Physics

Official description

This course provides an introduction to the thermodynamics, stability, and dynamics of the terrestrial atmosphere. It represents suitable preparation for research in experimental and theoretical atmospheric physics. It is also relevant for research in oceanography and planetary atmospheres. Topics for this year include hydrostatics, atmospheric vertical structure, dry and moist thermodynamics, stability for small- and large-amplitude displacements, conservation laws, internal gravity waves, geostrophic balance, thermal wind balance, vorticity, circulation, and potential vorticity. Coursework involves analytic and computational exercises, some observational data analysis, and reviews of papers in the Atmospheric Physics literature.

References (not required):

  • Atmospheric Science, An Introductory Survey, Second Edition, John M. Wallace and Peter V. Hobbs, Academic Press, 2006.
  • Fundamentals of Atmospheric Physics, Murry L. Salby, International Geophysics Volume 61, Academic Press, 1996.
  • An Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology, James R. Holton, International Geophysics Volume 88, Academic Press, 2004.
  • An Introduction to Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Benoit Cushman-Roisin and Jean Beckers, International Geophysics Volume 101, Elsevier.

Course format:

This is an in-person course that includes prerecorded video content as well as in-person lectures. Pre-recorded (asynchronous) content and notes will be posted in advance of in-person (synchronous) class meetings. Synchronous class meetings will be livestreamed should students wish to attend online, and recordings from these classes will also be posted

Link to cross listed course: PHY498H1/1498H

Textbook
                            Selected readings from "Fundamentals of Atmospheric Physics", Murry L. Salby, International Geophysics Volume 61, Academic Press, 1996. and "Atmospheric Science, An Introductory Survey, Second Edition", John M. Wallace and Peter V. Hobbs, Academic Press, 2006
                        

Additional information

PHY492/PHY1498 Advanced Undergraduate/Introductory Graduate

Atmospheric Physics

Instructor: Prof. Paul Kushner, Department of Physics, University of Toronto

Schedule/logistics:

  • Synchronous lectures: Tuesday 3-4 and Thursday 12-1. Starting Tuesday, September 15,

2022.

  • Tutorial: Tuesday 4-5
  • Location: McLennan Physics (MP) 134.
  • Material will include prerecorded videos to view before class.
  • Synchronous lectures and tutorials will be recorded for asynchronous viewing.

Most students of Physics have neither heard of Atmospheric Physics nor been encouraged to be curious about the Physics of Earth’s atmosphere – the gaseous environment in which we live and breathe. Remedy studying the principles of Atmospheric Physics here at the University of Toronto, one of the world’s premiere locales for Atmospheric Physics research. All you need is a solid background in physical sciences and a willingness to learn. We will seek an understanding of the terrestrial atmosphere’s structure, circulation and dynamics, starting from physical first principles. The course will involve analytic and computational exercises, some observational data analysis, and reviews of papers in the Atmospheric Physics literature.

course title
PHY1498H F (ARTS & SCI 492)
session
fall
group
cross listed course
time and location
This cross listed course is offered together with PHY492F. Synchronous lectures: Tuesday 3-4 and Thursday 12-1. Starting Tuesday, September 14, 2022. Tutorial: Tuesday 4-5 Location: McLennan Physics (MP) 134. Lectures and tutorials will be in-person and also live streamed on Zoom. Recordings and notes will be posted.
coordinator
Kushner, Paul
Paul Kushner
416-946-3683
MP716

Delivery Methods

In Person

A course is considered In Person if it requires attendance at a specific location and time for some or all course activities.*.

* Subject to adjustments imposed by public health requirements for physical distancing.

Online - Synchronous
A course is considered Online Synchronous if online attendance is expected at a specific time for some or all course activities, and attendance at a specific location is not expected for any activities or exams.
Asynchronous
A course is considered Asynchronous if it has no requirement for attendance at a specific time or location for any activities or exams.